Thunk.

/Thunk.

I realized early that I identified more with the ships I was reading about than their captains. Especially the brain ships. (I’m still incredibly partial to liveships like Farscape’s Moya, Bear & Monette’s The Lavinia Whateley (“Boojum”), and Aliette de Bodard’s mindships.)

It turns out that what I wanted wasn’t the story of a young woman coming to terms with her brace or her body (seriously it’s a fine story, but it didn’t fit me at all—or, rather, it fit me like a brace, constraining and awkward). What I wanted was something to love. I was listening for that familiar thunk on the hull; I just didn’t know it. That recognition that there was a mind inside a cage of muscle, bone, pain, fiberglass, and metal. The acknowledgement that a mind could do things—heroic things! Cool things!—even if the body rebelled.

Fran Wilde on living inside the hull.

This is the first posted essay from Invisible 3, the fast-becoming-annual collection about representation in speculative fiction.1 Go read it, then go buy the collection (the proceeds go to Con or Bust).

  1. Full disclosure: I have an essay in the second collection. ^
2017-06-21T10:59:58+00:0021st June, 2017|Tags: books, culture, sff|

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