It’s a metaphor about privilege.

/It’s a metaphor about privilege.

We’ve been playing a lot of Diablo III recently.

My husband is a Barbarian. He has the highest Paragon levels of all of us, the best gear, the best build. Best survivability, best DPS. He solos Greater Rifts. Like, Torment X+ ones.

Our characters are not nearly as badass as his is. Mostly, we just kind of follow along in his wake, picking up loot as we go. We gripe about doing no damage and about the RNG not dropping the right items for us. Y’know, the usual stuff.

The other day, my husband decided to re-roll a Monk. That meant I was nominated Party Leader for a while. I’m a wizard, for what it’s worth, which means I can deal a bit of damage (not as much as husband’s Barbarian) but I certainly can’t take much. I could drag our little party through events, but not nearly at as high a level as Barbarian could.

Tonight, over some wine, we made some jokes about it. “Yeah, but we can’t solo Torment X!” we said. “Not like your Barbarian.”

My husband looked quite lost. “Oh,” he said. “But… I thought it was frustrating for you, just running behind my Barbarian all the time? That’s why I re-rolled Monk.”

And, quite suddenly, I Got It. Because, yeah. It had been kind of frustrating, not doing very much while Barbarian charged on ahead, carrying us all. But we were frustrated because we wished that our characters could do the DPS and take the damage of the Barbarian. That is, we were frustrated because we wished our characters could be better.

And huband? husband interpreted it as us being frustrated because we wished his character was worse.

2016-03-06T22:09:14+00:00 6th March, 2016|Tags: culture, gaming|1 Comment

One Comment

  1. latenightliar 6th March, 2016 at 11:44 pm

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