This false consciousness is apparent throughout the business and political worlds, but it might be most acute in tech, an industry that still lacks a widely shared code of ethics. Facebook employees have been quitting or staging virtual walkouts in recent weeks, with some declaring their disgust at Mark Zuckerberg for refusing to do more about President Donald Trump’s incendiary, and typically unhinged, posts. It’s commendable that Facebook employees are beginning to wake up to the way their platform is used for fomenting racist violence and division. But even if it were to solve these issues, Facebook is irreparably compromised, a mega-machine of surveillance and data capture whose fundamental business model is based on ever more granular monitoring of users in order to coerce them into desired behaviors. Like Google, which operates according to similar surveillance capitalist principles, Facebook has seen employees calling for the company to be more overtly political in its support of causes like BLM. But until tech workers understand the exploitation that underwrites their fabulous salaries—whether that exploitation occurs in an Amazon warehouse, on Facebook’s platform, or behind the wheel of a Lyft— their calls for racial progress will ring only slightly less hollow than those emanating from Taser.

Jacob Silverman on empty gestures.

I still remember the first time I learned the same company that makes tasers also makes most police body cameras. Talk about cornering the whole police brutality market…