But, says JJ at File 770: If the members of AO3 get to call themselves official Hugo Award Winners, then so do all of the commenters at File 770, and so do all of the people who’ve had works published in Uncanny Magazine — and at that point, the official term “Hugo Award Winner” has lost all meaning.

Does File 770 tell its commenters, “you are wanted; you are an essential part of this blog site; it was created so you would have a place to make these comments?” Does it say, “we have created tools that let you post and edit and seek out comments like yours; please send us feedback on how to improve the comment threading?”

Do the authors who are published in Uncanny, choose what they get to publish there? Are they welcome to join a committee and shape the rules for what Uncanny will publish? Does Uncanny say, “Please send your creative works to us; we want them all; this magazine exists to showcase as much of your work as you are willing to share?”

Neither File 770 nor Uncanny was created to support all of the people involved in it equally. Neither of them allows random people to become contributors to searchable, front-page content. Neither of them says: “Your works are welcome here, even the ones that are antisocial, even the ones we personally don’t like, because this is your home if you want it to be.”

AO3 is not a curated collection; it’s a community.

I am done with listening to gatekeeping men who want to put lines around our creativity, who want to declare that while yes, two authors can both win for “best novella” and a team of 6 can win a “best fanzine” or “best podcast” award, a team of a million can’t possibly win the “best related work” award.

elf on communities.