Fame vs. craft.

/Fame vs. craft.

Okay, this may surprise you, but I believe most new writers basically want to get published so that they’ll be famous. They want that thrill of holding up a book with their name emblazoned on the cover, show it to their friends, leave it on their coffee table, maybe peruse a copy at the bookstore and casually mention to someone in the aisle, “You know… I wrote this.” I think most new writers are seeking fame and encouragement, that they believe validity and meaning will arrive out of publication. They see fame as offering a measurable amount of worth and competence.

[…]

Yet most writers who have achieved some level of fame fairly quickly eschew it in favor of craft. They may still enjoy the warmth associated with being recognized, or having someone come up and praise their words, but most successful authors discover that fame is not only fleeting, it doesn’t make us better people or better writers. And that, I think, is why so many successful writers I know spend considerable time attempting to improve their craft. In other words, the best writers are always trying to get better.

–Chip MacGregor on why everyone wants to be published.

MacGregor’s post is talking about writing craft versus authorial “legitimacy” (i.e. being published), and while I think he has a point, I don’t agree with all of it. More thoughts on why later. Maybe.

Hmm…

2016-05-14T11:08:07+00:00 4th November, 2015|Tags: publishing, writing|Comments Off on Fame vs. craft.