Just because I was thinking of this the other day (and don’t really have a better introduction to it than this): have a list of my Most Used Apps on various platforms!


Desktop

Scrivener

Always and forever my go-to writing app. I’ve been a Scrivener users since… geeze. 2006-ish, maybe? It took a bit of a learning curve at first, but honestly nowadays I can’t imagine writing in anything else. Even if I never can find anything in the, uh. Eccentrically structured menus. And the changes to the Compile feature in the latest version threw off all my workflows. Still! Whether it’s exporting manuscripts to send to editors or HTML to copy-paste in the AO3, Scrivener is pretty much never closed on my laptop.

Sublime Text

Sort of the last generation “cool text editor”, currently a bit abandoned when everyone decided to shill for Microsoft and use Atom instead.1 Sublime itself is pretty much just a bog-standard text editor of the type the proliferates a dime-a-dozen, but what really makes it stand out is its extension gallery. Other than a sweet-ass theme, critical extensions I install on every version of Sublime I run (and I run it on Windows, macOS, and Ubuntu) include the ability to live-sync projects via FTP,2 and to write documents in markdown then export them to .docx format (because fuck Word, basically).

Firefox

I need a browser that can sync across Windows, macOS, iOS, and Ubuntu, that isn’t Chrome. Firefox it is. Undoubtedly my most used app, on any platform.

Coda

Honestly I probably get less use out of this than I used to, but it’s nonetheless my go-to editor for any webdev stuff that’s “heavier” than a few quick live edits in Sublime. Not to mention Coda is apparently soon-to-be phased out in favor of its successor, Nova. Which, from the looks of it, either might be my go-to replacement for both Coda and Sublime, at least on macOS… or it could be another disaster like Atom.3

Deckset

Another entry into the “anything Microsoft Office can do, Markdown with an export template can do better” pile, in this case replace PowerPoint (or Keynote, I suppose). I don’t do a huge amount of presentations in general so not the most frequently used app on this list, but one of the most lifesaving when it is required.

1Password

My password vault. Seriously, if you don’t have a password vault? Get one. It doesn’t have to be this one—there are cheaper options out there—but I’ve been a 1Password user for years and, some minor hiccups aside4 I’ve been pretty happy with the results.


Mobile

Scrivener (again)

I used to have a somewhat convoluted workflow for syncing Scrivener to my phone, which all turned obsolete as soon as the native app was released. Most of the fiction-related words I’ve written since about circa 2012 have been done on my phone, so… critical app, indeed.

Reeder

Another app I’ve used since its first version. Best RSS reading app out there, hands down.

Clip Studio Paint

Recently replaced Procreate as my go-to art application. For the record I still like (and use!) the latter app, but CSP brushes just feel more natural to me (I always feel vaguely like I’m fighting Procreate to get it to render how I want). Does have a bit of a garbage UI, though…

Prompt

A Telnet/SSH client from the people who brought you Coda.5 Does exactly as advertised and looks good while it’s at it. Perfect for (a har) panicked service restarts while out-and-about.


Web

Habitica

I’ve been a Habitica subscriber since its Habit RPG days,6 and it functions as my general daily go-to todo list. That being said, I have quite an extensive system of scripted task automation,7 without which I probably wouldn’t find Habitica as useful as I do, so…

  1. Which, honestly, I loathe. Don’t get me started of freakin’ Atom. Guh. []
  2. Developing in Production is for ballers don’t at me. []
  3. Honestly… I’m tentatively assuming the former, since Panic really does make pretty good stuff. But… we’ll see. []
  4. coughTheir switch to a subscription model rather than up-front pricing…cough []
  5. And Firewatch, of all things. []
  6. As @lokabrenna, so… come say hi if you like? []
  7. Note that the API has changed a bit since I made that post, so the code snippets probably won’t work 100% out-of-the-box, but they should at least get you started! []