Alis

/Alis

About Alis

Alis Franklin is a thirtysomething Australian author of queer urban fantasy. She likes cooking, video games, Norse mythology, and feathered dinosaurs. She’s never seen a live drop bear, but stays away from tall trees, just in case.

Gatekept.

But, says JJ at File 770: If the members of AO3 get to call themselves official Hugo Award Winners, then so do all of the commenters at File 770, and so do all of the people who’ve had works published in Uncanny Magazine — and at that point, the official term “Hugo Award Winner” has lost all meaning.

Does File 770 tell its commenters, “you are wanted; you are an essential part of this blog site; it was created so you would have a place to make these comments?” Does it say, “we have created tools that let you post and edit and seek out comments like yours; please send us feedback on how to improve the comment threading?”

Do the authors who are published in Uncanny, choose what they get to publish there? Are they welcome to join a committee and shape the rules for what Uncanny will publish? Does Uncanny say, “Please send your creative works to us; we want them all; this magazine exists to showcase as much of your work as you are willing to share?”

Neither File 770 nor Uncanny was created to support all of the people involved in it equally. Neither of them allows random people to become contributors to searchable, front-page content. Neither of them says: “Your works are welcome here, even the ones that are antisocial, even the ones we personally don’t like, because this is your home if you want it to be.”

AO3 is not a curated collection; it’s a community.

I am done with listening to gatekeeping men who want to put lines around our creativity, who want to declare that while yes, two authors can both win for “best novella” and a team of 6 can win a “best fanzine” or “best podcast” award, a team of a million can’t possibly win the “best related work” award.

elf on communities.

2019-09-20T07:25:52+10:0020th September, 2019|Tags: ao3, fandom, hugo awards, sff|

Die mad about it.

If a segment of fandom wants to come and tell me that my campaign to see the Archive of Our Own recognized as a marvel, a miracle of collaborative international action from thousands of fans across the world, after watching Livejournal blast my communities into nothing and AVOS rip del.icio.s to shreds, was somehow antithetical to what the Hugos stand for, come on. Bring it to me and make your case. If you want to compare my work promoting the Hugos to other communities outside the tiny circle of WSFS voters to the work of Nazis and fascists, come on, you bloviating fleshbags. I’m waiting. If you want to tell people that joking around about a Hugo Award win is somehow robbing the award of something irreplaceable, it’s on you to convince me how some fans jokingly writing “.0000000001% Hugo Award winner” devalues the Hugo Awards sitting on my mantle for the work I’ve done on Lady Business. Come on, if you’re so certain, so sure, that the joy and pleasure I’ve watched fans experience after being recognized by other fans, is somehow harmful to the Hugo Award—tell me just how the undermining of the award is going to go. Show me where other Hugo Award winners have expressed the dire prediction that their award is now worthless, just worthless! I expect citations of where they’ve tossed it in the trash. I’ve read lots of your very sad internet tears already and haven’t been convinced, and I’m pretty sure I have more Hugo Awards than most of the people complaining.

renay is part of the .0000000001%.

renay, of course, has been championing the AO3-for-Hugos push since 2014.

See also:

And for lolz:

(“World” Science Fiction Society. Uh-huh…)

2019-09-19T15:50:47+10:0019th September, 2019|Tags: ao3, fandom, hugo awards, sff|

More speech than others.

In a study by George Washington University comparing white nationalists and ISIS social media usage, Twitter’s freedom of speech was not granted to ISIS. Twitter suspended 1,100 accounts related to ISIS whereas it suspended only seven accounts related to Nazis, white nationalism, and white supremacy, despite the accounts having more than seven times the followers, and tweeting 25 times more than the ISIS accounts. Twitter here made a moral judgment that the fewer, less active, and less influential ISIS accounts were somehow not welcome on their platform, whereas the prolific and burgeoning Nazi and white supremacy accounts were.

So, Twitter has shown that it won’t protect free speech at all costs or for all users. We can only conclude that Twitter is either intentionally protecting white supremacy or simply doesn’t think it’s very dangerous. Regardless of which it is (I think I know), the outcome does not change the fact that white supremacy is running rampant on its platforms and many others.

Tatiana Mac asks whose peaches?

On a charitable reading, it’s possible Twitter experiences more direct legal pressure (e.g. from law enforcement and/or intelligence agencies) to shut-down certain types of extremist content than others, which is a manifestation of shitty trends within the broader sociopolitical spectrum but also, on the flip side, not exactly exonerating…

2019-04-29T12:06:53+10:0018th September, 2019|Tags: culture, social media, twitter|

Women’s writing.

According to Kevin Standlee, the Hugo goes to “whoever the [Hugo] Administrator identified as representing the platform called AO3”, but as near as I can tell there is no such person or people.

The Hugo was awarded to the AO3, as a project of the OTW. That’s all the little rocket ship says.

The WSFS position, as I’m beginning to understand it, is that there are no actual human beings who have a right to public credit themselves with the AO3 Hugo win, and that’s kind of a problem for me.

fairestcat on who gets credit.

Compare and contrast this.

2019-09-18T08:33:47+10:0018th September, 2019|Tags: ao3, fandom, hugo awards, sff|

Coddled.

[Greg] Lukianoff and [Jonathan] Haidt go out of their way to reassure us: “Neither of us has ever voted for a Republican for Congress or the presidency.” Like Mark Lilla, Pinker and Francis Fukuyama, who have all condemned identity politics in recent books, they are careful to distinguish themselves from the unwashed masses – those who also hate identity politics and supposedly brought us Donald Trump. In fact, the data shows that it was precisely the better-off people in poor places, perhaps not so unlike these famous professors in the struggling academy, who elected Trump; but never mind. I believe that these pundits, like the white suburban Dad in the horror film Get Out, would have voted for Barack Obama a third time.

Moira Weigel on liberal elites.

From a review of Lukianoff and Haidt’s execrable book and a look at the rightwards trend of white, mostly male, liberals more broadly but, even more relevantly, that last sentence is such a sick fucking burn.

Incidentally, as an Australian, it is no mystery whatsoever to me that self-proclaimed liberals always seem to end up in bed with the far right whenever they’re even remotely challenged on anything. Pretty much the only mystery is how the hell American liberals apparently managed to hide themselves for so long…

2019-03-26T08:42:27+10:0017th September, 2019|Tags: culture, politics|

Crap in, crap out.

A look at the history, use, and misuse of the calorie.

TIL from this article:

  • Some people have small intestines that are up to 50% longer than others, which makes them 50% better at digesting food!
  • Cold toast has fewer (usable) calories than hot toast.
  • Coconut oil reduces the caloric content of rice.
  • Reheated pasta/rice/potatoes/bread have fewer calories than fresh pasta/rice/potatoes/bread.
  • The Chinese thing about not drinking cold water is actually kind of correct? Although for exactly the opposite reason.1

Tl;dr everything you know about food science is wrong.

  1. Drinking very cold water doesn’t “slow down” you organs; it apparently makes you body burn more calories to try and keep your core temperature stable. Which I guess could be a problem if you lived somewhere/-when where food scarcity was an issue, e.g. if you were a Ye Oldene Timese Chinese peasant. []
2019-03-25T15:14:29+10:0016th September, 2019|Tags: cw: dieting, food, science|

uk wut u doin brah

What is being decided here is not just about Brexit. It is about the biggest constitutional question you can ask in any country: Who holds legitimate political power? Is it the people, or Parliament, or the government?

For centuries, there was a settled answer. Parliament held the power by virtue of votes from the people. The Brexit referendum provided the government with a mechanism to sidestep that arrangement and portray itself as the voice of the people independently from Parliament. The events of the next few weeks will show which of those visions is victorious. The stakes couldn’t be higher.

Ian Dunt explains Brexit in two paragraphs.

Incidentally, if you don’t know the difference between, in particular, “Parliament”1 and “the government”, and why selecting one or the other as the embodied will of the people makes so much difference in a democracy… then you can probably thank half a century of right-wing populist demagoguery and intentional attempts to undermine public understanding of and participation in the democratic process, honestly.

  1. Americans, you may substitute “Congress” for “Parliament” here. []
2019-09-16T07:53:56+10:0016th September, 2019|Tags: brexit, politics|

Oh, AO3, no.

So the AO3 put out a statement “reminding” all its users that they are not actually Hugo Award-winning authors and honestly I think that means it is now law for all AO3 users to put “Hugo Award-Winning Author” in every social media profile they have.

Not to mention that this post in particular from Kevin “Fun Police” Standlee pretty much makes it obligatory for fandom to try and get fic to win in every length category in 2020.1

But how do I do that, Alis?

You buy a supporting membership to CoNZealand. It’s NZD 75 (a little less than USD 50). It allows you to both nominate and vote for the Hugos, and you’ll get a voter packet of nominated words, so it’s pretty much the best way to cheaply pick up the “best” (commercial) SFF of any one year, regardless of any other considerations.

Incidentally, pretty much the reason fic doesn’t already routinely smash the awards is because, a) people don’t think about it as eligible,2 and b) when they do fandom tends to be so broad and fractured compared to the teeny tiny incestuous world of American SFF publishing that the vote is massively split.

  1. It seriously will not be hard; the voting pool for the Hugos is a few thousand people, max. Given that popular fics in major fandoms can get literally multiple orders of magnitude of engagement above and beyond that… []
  2. See also: fandom cultural cringe. []
2019-09-15T11:00:34+10:0015th September, 2019|Tags: ao3, fandom, hugo awards, sff|