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Women’s writing.

According to Kevin Standlee, the Hugo goes to “whoever the [Hugo] Administrator identified as representing the platform called AO3”, but as near as I can tell there is no such person or people.

The Hugo was awarded to the AO3, as a project of the OTW. That’s all the little rocket ship says.

The WSFS position, as I’m beginning to understand it, is that there are no actual human beings who have a right to public credit themselves with the AO3 Hugo win, and that’s kind of a problem for me.

fairestcat on who gets credit.

Compare and contrast this.

2019-09-18T08:33:47+11:0018th September, 2019|Tags: ao3, fandom, hugo awards, sff|

Oh, AO3, no.

So the AO3 put out a statement “reminding” all its users that they are not actually Hugo Award-winning authors and honestly I think that means it is now law for all AO3 users to put “Hugo Award-Winning Author” in every social media profile they have.

Not to mention that this post in particular from Kevin “Fun Police” Standlee pretty much makes it obligatory for fandom to try and get fic to win in every length category in 2020.1

But how do I do that, Alis?

You buy a supporting membership to CoNZealand. It’s NZD 75 (a little less than USD 50). It allows you to both nominate and vote for the Hugos, and you’ll get a voter packet of nominated words, so it’s pretty much the best way to cheaply pick up the “best” (commercial) SFF of any one year, regardless of any other considerations.

Incidentally, pretty much the reason fic doesn’t already routinely smash the awards is because, a) people don’t think about it as eligible,2 and b) when they do fandom tends to be so broad and fractured compared to the teeny tiny incestuous world of American SFF publishing that the vote is massively split.

  1. It seriously will not be hard; the voting pool for the Hugos is a few thousand people, max. Given that popular fics in major fandoms can get literally multiple orders of magnitude of engagement above and beyond that… []
  2. See also: fandom cultural cringe. []
2019-09-15T11:00:34+11:0015th September, 2019|Tags: ao3, fandom, hugo awards, sff|

Buh-byyyyeeeee…

The Campbells are gone (or at least renamed).

Also big shout-out to the announcement post’s hand-wringing description of Campbell’s provocative editorials and opinions on race, slavery, and other matters, which.

2019-08-28T08:02:19+11:0028th August, 2019|Tags: books, culture, fandom, hugo awards, pop culture, sff|

Campbell dunking season.

Because ’tis the season, archive.org apparently has a scanned copy of Collected Editorials from Analog, a selection of John W. Campbell’s op-eds collated by Harry Harrison—he’s the guy who wrote the novel Soylent Green1 was very loosely based on—seemingly for the purpose of… dunking on John W. Campbell. Content warnings for the usual Campbell garbage, especially virulent racism.

For the tl;dr version, James Davis Nicoll did a review back in 2014 and, well. The title alone really should give it away.

I mean, y’all know I kinda side-eye so-called “hard” science fiction in general, but… ye-ee-eah. Given that this is the sort of garbage believed in by its so-called “father”…

  1. It’s people! []
2019-08-22T15:46:16+11:0022nd August, 2019|Tags: books, fandom, pop culture, sff|

Ramshackle genre.

John W. Campbell, for whom this award was named, was a fascist. Through his editorial control of Amazing Stories, he is responsible for setting a tone of science fiction that still haunts the genre to this day. Sterile. Male. White. Exalting in the ambitions of imperialists and colonisers, settlers and industrialists. Yes, I am aware there are exceptions.

But these bones, we have grown wonderful, ramshackle genre, wilder and stranger than his mind could imagine or allow.

Jeannette Ng accepts an award.

I was wondering why I was suddenly getting so many hits again on my old John Campbell post

(I’m certainly not the first person to’ve pointed out that Campbell was an asshole, but I think I was kinda the most recent person to point out that the award really shouldn’t be named after him? Either way: still totally should rename that, hey.)

2019-08-20T15:52:53+11:0020th August, 2019|Tags: culture, fandom, hugo awards, pop culture, sff|

Obligatory Hugos winner posts.

So the results are up. Some of you may remember I did some drive-by commentary on some of the nominees (novels, novellas, novellettes, short stories), so… meh. Biggest (pleasant) surprise here is Zen Cho’s win in the novellette category; I really loved that work but didn’t think it would win. So… yay for being wrong on that one.

(more…)

2019-08-19T11:30:44+11:0019th August, 2019|Tags: books, fandom, hugo awards, sff|

Adventures in booth manning.

So last weekend was GAMMA.CON, and for my sins I ended up manning the CSFG‘s booth through most of Saturday. We had a shared table with Conflux and it was, uh. An experience. Part of it was possibly the placement; we were up in the back corner near all the sword and prop manufacturers, when we’d probably have been more suited to being in the author’s alley segment. And part of it was straight-up lack of planning; our notification was very, uh. Short. So it was definitely a last-minute scramble to organize things to actually put on the table. We did okay—anthologies were sold, tentaplushies were squeezed—mostly thanks to the arrival of Kaaron Warren, who’s much better at this sort of thing than yours truly.

(more…)

2019-08-05T09:03:20+11:005th August, 2019|Tags: books, cons, csfg, fandom, gamma.con, sff|

Attack of the OEAs.

Maciej Cegłowski, the guy who created Pinboard, with a (positive) retrospect on his interactions with fandom.

Probably some chuckles in here for anyone who’s ever been involved with any kind of fandom project, and has experienced the overly earnest deluges of enthusiasm that can sometimes accompany them. Also interesting to see an outsider’s reaction to what, from inside fandom, seem like Entirely Normal Tagging Conventions…

One of the things I think it’s very easy to forget, is that fandom is just as full of, say. Data scientists and librarians and coders as it is with any other profession. People bring in norms and conventions from their day jobs—or make up new, better ones in reaction to things they’ve seen done poorly—and they get adopted by other fans and normalized. To an outsider, I suppose it can seem like some kind of spontaneous, magical, wisdom-of-crowds thing—given that fandom identifies as Fandom, not as Profession—but… it’s really not. It’s just a lot of people with a lot of different experiences and skills and knowledge, all coming together to find the most efficient way of producing and consuming poly tentacle sex pollen fics featuring their favorite characters from film/TV/et al.

2019-02-05T12:02:43+11:0017th July, 2019|Tags: fandom, tech|